Jordans Publishing article: The 'Rippling' effect of Montgomery v Lanarkshire Health Board, May, 2015

Jordans Publishing article: The 'Rippling' effect of Montgomery v Lanarkshire Health Board, May, 2015

7 May, 2015

The Supreme Court held that:

'An adult person of sound mind is entitled to decide which, if any, of the available forms of treatment to undergo, and her consent must be obtained before treatment interfering with her bodily integrity is undertaken. The doctor is therefore under a duty to take reasonable care to ensure that the patient is aware of any material risks involved in any recommended treatment, and of any reasonable alternative or variant treatments. The test of materiality is whether, in the circumstances of the particular case, a reasonable person in the patient's position would be likely to attach significance to the risk, or the doctor is or should reasonably be aware that the particular patient would be likely to attach significance to it.
The doctor is however entitled to withhold from the patient information as to a risk if he reasonably considers that its disclosure would be seriously detrimental to the patient's health. The doctor is also excused from conferring with the patient in circumstances of necessity, as for example where the patient requires treatment urgently but is unconscious or otherwise unable to make a decision. It is unnecessary for the purposes of this case to consider in detail the scope of those exceptions.'

This would suggest that our NHS will now have to adjust in two major respects: first, it will have to organise its method of obtaining the patient’s consent much better, and secondly, it may find that more patients will opt for treatments which either directly cost more, or take up more hospital time.

Click here to read the article in full


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